Medical Procedures

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Contents

Credits

Written by:

Reviewed by:

Last Revision Stardate: 110224

Intended Audience:

  • All current and future members of United Federation Starfleet Medical Branch

Medical Procedures

Standard Medical Examination

All Starfleet personnel aboard your ship/station/facility must receive a standard medical examination from a member of the Medical staff before they can be cleared for duty. Likewise, all visitors must be cleared by Medical before they are allowed to mix with the general population.

Standard Medical Examinations should be given to crew members at the following times:

  1. When the crew member is first posted to the ship/station/facility.
  2. When the crew member returns from an LOA.
  3. When the crew member returns from an away mission.
  4. If the crew member reports to the sickbay/infirmary with any medical complaints.
  5. At six monthly intervals thereafter.


Standard Medical Examinations should be carried out according to the following procedure:

  • Medical Records
The attending physician should review the patient’s medical history before beginning the examination so that they are familiar with any existing medical conditions.
For new personnel: Medical histories should be provided by their previous Chief Medical Officer.
For existing personnel: Medical histories should be accessed from the ship/station/facility medical database.
  • Physical Evaluation
Cardiovascular: Heart rate and blood pressure must be within 2% tolerance of the recommended average levels for that species. Blood gas levels and viscosity should be analysed to ensure adequate distribution to internal organs and establish if there is any risk of embolism.
Pulmonary: Respiratory rate should be within 3% tolerance of the recommended average level for that species. Oxygen intake should be measured and tracked to ensure no obstruction of the airways.
Gastroenterological: Stomach acid levels should be within 0.5% tolerance of the recommended average levels for that species. The digestive track should be free of obstructions or swelling. Nutritional absorption levels should be tracked and recorded.
Neurological: All neurological readings (e.g. engramatic stability, cerebral activity, neurotransmitter levels) should be within 0.1% tolerance of the recommended average levels for that species. Any variances should be recorded and the patient admitted to Sickbay/Infirmary while further scans are run.
Hormonal: All hormones present should be within 5% tolerance of the recommended average levels for that species. Any variances between 5 and 10% should be recorded and monitored over the period of a week. Any variances over 10% should be recorded and the patient admitted to Sickbay/Infirmary while further scans are run.
  • Ocular Evaluation
All crew are required to pass a basic visual acuity test with a minimum score of 60%.
A retinal scan should be taken and filed with the patient’s medical history.
Scans should be run on all areas of the eyes and optic nerves.
  • Auditory Evaluation
All crew are required to pass a basic auditory acuity test with a minimum score of 60%.
Scans should be run on all areas of the auditory organs and adjacent nerves.
  • Psychological Evaluation
A crew member may only be cleared for duty if the attending medical officer is satisfied that they are of sound mind and able to make rational judgements.


Triage Procedure

Medical Triage is the process of prioritising patients conditions in order of severity.

When Triaging patients, Medical personnel should consider the following:

  • The current medical status of their Patient e.g. Breathing, conscious.
  • How severe their patient’s injuries are.
  • What they can realistically accomplish given their available resources and time.


Patients should be prioritised into one of the following categories:

  • Red - The patient will die, if advanced emergency intervention (surgery, stasis tube, ICU stabilization) is not performed within 30 minutes of time of triage.
  • Yellow - Emergency care needed, but can be stabilised and a delay of no more that 1.5 hours before Patient's condition will change to Red.
  • Green - Known as "walking wounded": fractures, burns (less than 20% of surface), lacerations, simple ophthalmic injuries, etc.
  • Black - Regardless of medical intervention, the patient will die (e.g. open skull fracture, burns over 70% of surface, bilateral non-stable amputation, cardiac & respiratory failure).


Resucutative Procedure

In the case that a patient’s cardiovascular activity suddenly ceases (i.e. blood stops flowing and oxygen stops being delivered to organs) then the following procedure should be carried out. The attending Medical personnel must act quickly as carbon dioxide will begin to build up within the organic tissue and cells will begin to die. Cardiovascular and Pulmonary revival is required quickly to prevent permanent damage to the patient’s internal organs and brain.

  • Step 1. Apply cardio-stimulators starting at 200 joules and administer a 2cc dose of Leporazine. If there is no response:
  • Step 2. Apply cardio-stimulators at 300 joules. If there is no response:
  • Step 3. Apply cardio-stimulators at 360 joules. If there is no response:
  • Step 4. Utilise a cortical-stimulator only as a last resort. The use of direct cortical stimulation in a severely injured patient with any form of hear trauma is an extreme medical procedure and stands a chance of worsening injuries by causing renewed swelling and bleeding of the brain.


Reporting Procedure

  • Report Submission
All reports should be submitted to the Chief Medical Officer, or in their absence the Medical Officer left in command.
All reports must be submitted in a timely manner. Late reports may result in disciplinary action.
  • Reporting Schedule
An activity report should be submitted to the Chief Medical Officer at the end of each duty shift.
  • Report Content
Reports should outline all activity from each duty shift, including but not limited to: patients treated, duties carried out, communications sent/received, tests run.
  • Report Format
All reports must adhere to the basic Medical Report format below:
To: (Chief Medical Officer)
From: (Your name and Rank)
Date: (Time and Date of your duty shift)
Duties Performed: (List all duties carried out during your shift)
Patients: (List all patients treated during your duty shift. For each patient list their name, the time at which they were treated, symptoms, your diagnosis and treatments given.)
Communications: (List any communications sent/received during your shift. For each communication list who it was to/from and it’s purpose.)
Tests: (List all tests run, experiments carried out and/or research done during your shift. For each, state clearly what it was, equipment/resources used, and it’s purpose.)
Incidents: (Any incidents that took place during your shift should be reported here.)
A.O.R.I: (Any other relevant information that doesn’t fall within the headings above should be listed here.)